Horse charity wins gold at RHS Chelsea Flower Show

World Horse Welfare's Artisan garden has won a Gold medal at the RHS Chelsea flower show.

The World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

The World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

The garden tells the story of Clippy, a 12hh dapple grey pony, who was rescued from terrible conditions by World Horse Welfare and restored to health.  

Funded by a private donor, the tradition wildflower garden, designed by Adam Woolcott and Jonathan Smith, aims to shine a spotlight on ‘invisible’ horses around the world whose suffering goes unnoticed or ignored.

“We are tickled pink to have been awarded this medal," said World Horse Welfare CEO Roly Owers.

"Our garden gives us such a brilliant platform to tell a story that so well reflects the thousands of horses who desperately need our help today. It also provides us with the perfect stage to celebrate our 90th anniversary and recognise all those who have helped us reach this milestone."

World Horse Welfare Clippy meets Kirstie Allsopp at RHS Chelsea 2017 (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

World Horse Welfare Clippy meets Kirstie Allsopp at RHS Chelsea 2017 (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

Why World Horse Welfare designed a garden

In Britain alone there are more than 3,400 horses are at risk leaving World Horse Welfare working hard to help horses internationally and on our doorstep. 

The RHS Chelsea Show for gave the charity the opportunity to design a garden that would tell a story and highlight the plight of so many 'at risk' horses.

Garden Designers (L-R) Jonathan Smith and Adam Woolcott with the gold medal (Pic: World Horse Welfare) 

Garden Designers (L-R) Jonathan Smith and Adam Woolcott with the gold medal (Pic: World Horse Welfare) 

What's the World Horse Welfare garden made from?

The garden contains a life size sculpture of Clippy, made from horse shoes donated by famous equine personalities.

The garden also features a special tribute to just some of the many supporters who have left the charity a legacy in their will, with their names carved into an element of the garden in tribute.

Visitors will be asked to sign ribbons sewed onto lead rope clips with wishes for Clippy’s future. 

"We would like to express our sincere thanks to the garden designers Jonathan Smith and Adam Woolcott, the contractors Conway Landscapes, sculptor Tom Hill and finally to the private donor who funded the garden and wishes to remain anonymous," said the team at World Horse Welfare.



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