Mare found with skin falling off saves foals

A mare who was found with open sores all over her body was caring for her own foal and an orphan at the time, say World Horse Welfare.

Maggie Rosie and Jim in the safety of World Horse Welfares Glenda Spooner Farm (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

Maggie Rosie and Jim in the safety of World Horse Welfares Glenda Spooner Farm (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

Piebald mare Maggie was in a terrible condition when she was found. She was dangerously underweight, covered in infected sores and her skin was peeling off her back and face. Despite her awful condition, Maggie continued to be a loving mother, doting on her own foal, Rosie, as well as another foal named Jim, who was an orphan.

The three were taken to World Horse Welfare’s Glenda Spooner Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre in Somerset. It was here that Maggie’s condition was found to be worse than originally thought – she had maggots living under the infected skin on her back.

Maggies skin on arrival at World Horse Welfare (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

Maggies skin on arrival at World Horse Welfare (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

With care from the World Horse Welfare team, Maggie’s skin cleared up until she was strong enough to be turned out in a paddock with her two foals.

Sadly, a couple of months later, Maggie took a turn for the worse. Despite round-the-clock nursing, Maggie’s condition continued to deteriorate and the team at World Horse Welfare made the difficult decision to put her down.

World Horse Welfare Glenda Spooner Farm Supervisor, Sara Jerman, said: “Maggie’s skin condition was probably the worst I’ve ever seen. The sores on her back and face were open and really red, her ribs and hip bones were clearly visible and despite all this she was still being an incredibly good mother by taking care of the two foals.

Maggie upon arrival at World Horse Welfare (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

Maggie upon arrival at World Horse Welfare (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

“Once Maggie’s skin condition began to clear up, we were then able to turn her out in the paddock with her two foals where they were all able to explore and relax, knowing that they were in the best of care. Sadly, after a couple of months Maggie’s condition started to deteriorate with her quickly becoming very ill and it was apparent there was something else wrong with her.

“While we were all incredibly sad to lose this lovely mare, her legacy will live on in these two beautiful little foals. Maggie was an amazing mother, giving everything she could to both brave little foals and they are now thriving in our care.

Rosie and Jim receiving Christmas gifts (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

Rosie and Jim receiving Christmas gifts (Pic: World Horse Welfare)

“There are many more invisible horses out there just like Maggie, Rosie and Jim who are in need of our help and with the harsh winter weather setting in, we are likely to see an increase. World Horse Welfare relies entirely on voluntary donations and without our dedicated supporters; we would simply not be able to continue helping vulnerable horses and ponies to have a second chance.”

Throughout December World Horse Welfare will be sharing stories of rescue, hope and inspiration, showing just how vital our supporters’ donations are in helping the team give horses the ultimate gift of care this Christmas.

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