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Stop your horse refusing at fillers

rating is 0

Carol Mailer, 09 July 2012 10:32

Show jumping trainer, Carol Mailer, gives her top tips to prevent your horse from bouncing on the spot and refusing at fillers. If your horse bounces on the spot when slowing down to a fence, the first thing to sort out is the safety issue – it’s no good having a brilliant jumper if he bounces you out of the ...

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Lengthen your strides

rating is 5

Carol Mailer, 14 May 2012 16:53

Carol Mailer gives her advice on how to lengthen or shorten your strides between jumps. Before you get too keen on jumping, think about improving the quality of the canter with a grid of poles on the ground. Used correctly, just a few canter poles will help you recognise how well you’re producing the nice up tempo forward stride you ...

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Know your striding: Part 11 - Riding a dog leg

rating is 3

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 13:39

Striding out distances need never confuse you again – our guide shows you how to get the most from ground poles. When you’ve established a straight, forward approach and getaway from a fence, and can ride consistently towards the centre, start to tackle more advanced exercises, like riding a dog-leg. A dog-leg is the line you take when you have ...

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Know your striding: Part 10 - Arrowheads on the ground

rating is 3

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 12:47

Striding out distances need never confuse you again – our guide shows you how to get the most from ground poles. “Some riders like to place the poles in an inverted ‘v’ resting on the middle of the fence, but I don’t like this,” Carol says. “I don’t think it’s safe if the horse hits one of the poles, as ...

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Know your striding: Part 9 - Riding combinations

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Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 12:33

The double (pictured above right) has one clear canter stride between the two elements. Doing plenty of work on canter poles has clearly established a good distance for our models Maxi and Reiko. “Maxi’s jumped the double several times, and each time he’s taken off and landed over the first element in a slightly different spot,” says Carol. “However, because ...

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Know your striding: Part 8 - Related distances

rating is 3

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 12:32

Striding out distances need never confuse you again – our guide shows you how to get the most from ground poles. Related distances refers to the number of strides needed to jump related fences.You need to allow six feet for your horse to take off, clear and land over a fence, and another six feet for him to do the ...

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Know your striding: Part 7 - Placing poles

rating is 2.5

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 12:30

Striding out distances need never confuse you again – our guide shows you how to get the most from ground poles. A placing pole should be put nine feet in front of the fence, which is three paces of three feet each. Placing poles are useful if you or your horse are inexperienced at jumping, and need extra help to ...

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Know your striding: Part 6 - Using canter poles to jump

rating is 2

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 11:41

Striding out distances need never confuse you again – our guide shows you how to get the most from ground poles. A canter pole is placed 12 feet – one canter stride – either side of the fence. Measure the 12 feet out exactly. Remember you’re aiming to pace four even strides of three feet each. Putting a canter pole before ...

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Know your striding: Part 5 - Riding over canter poles

rating is 2

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 11:37

What to aim for: “The same canter you’d jump from,” says Carol. “It has to be forward and powerful, but not fast and flat, or he’ll knock the poles the same way as he’d knock a jump.”Potential problems: Rushing, jumping over the poles instead of striding over them.Troubleshooting: If your horse tries to rush the poles, circle him in front ...

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Know your striding: Part 4 - Riding over trot poles

rating is 3

Carol Mailer, 11 August 2008 10:30

What to aim for: A forward, rhythmical and balanced trot, over the centre of each pole. Count “one, two, one, two” out loud as your horse takes each stride, and aim to keep your counting – and therefore your rhythm – the same over the poles. Don’t move up to trot until you’re able to ride over a series of ...

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