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Your Horse has always been first for trusted expert advice and now Britain’s No. 1 monthly horse magazine is delighted to bring you an ever-expanding library of expert video instruction online.

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Dealing with flies: All you need to know about flies: Housefly

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Gil Riley, 25 August 2009 14:36

The good news is that houseflies don’t actually bite your horse. The bad news is that they are of real nuisance value, distracting and annoying your horse, as well as passing on infections. Houseflies target your horse’s eyes, since they feed on the liquid secretions there. As a result, they are often responsible for transporting infectious bacteria to the eye, ...

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Dealing with flies: All you need to know about flies: Botfly

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Gil Riley, 25 August 2009 14:28

If you see an insect that looks something like a honeybee buzzing busily around your horse’s legs, the chances are it isn’t a bee but a bot fly. Female bot flies are often observed on warm, sunny days with their load of yellow eggs carried underneath them resembling an undercarriage. She hovers near your horse, then darts in rapidly to ...

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Dealing with flies: All you need to know about flies: Horsefly

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Gil Riley, 25 August 2009 14:26

Horseflies are large stealthy flies with a very powerful and painful bite. They land and feed anywhere on the horse’s body. To bite, their jaws move in a scissor-like fashion, shearing the flesh, causing extreme discomfort and swelling. Although commonly present on open fields, they prefer wooded areas where they lay waiting in shady areas for us and our horses ...

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Dealing with flies: All you need to know about flies: Blackfly

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Gil Riley, 25 August 2009 14:13

Blackflies are similar to midges in that they’re about the same size and bite horses to obtain a blood meal (and in the process release their saliva which can cause sweet itch). However, unlike the midge, they tend to bite on the inside of the horse’s ears. This is particularly painful and irritating. Persistent targeting results in scabbing and crusting ...

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All you need to know about flies: Culicoides

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Gil Riley, 25 August 2009 12:42

In the UK, several species of the culicoides midge exist. Present from as early as March right through to October, the female culicodes requires a blood meal to mature her eggs, which she gets by biting our horses, usually along the back or belly. Midges are tiny with a wing length less than 2mm and they can only fly a ...

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