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You are in... Forums > Welcome To Your Horse Forum > The Yard > Dangerous practices !!!

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brook

Joined:

Sep 08

Posts: 5217

brook says:

Dangerous practices !!!

This one i've seen so many times and it drives me nuts ! Actually a friend who's an Ai did this the other day, she was tacking up her horse and took off his headcollar and fastened it around his neck without firstly undoing the lead rope, I always undo the lead rope and leave it just loose through the ring so if Tenor was to pull back he would'nt hang himself ! Does anyone else have to witness some stupid or dangerous practices ? 

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lauralou15

Joined:

Apr 10

Posts: 457

lauralou15 says:

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

 I'm afraid im one to put a headcollar around the neck :/ I only do it ver breifly just to put the bridle on never leave him like it but hes very good and doesn't move..unless the headcollar comes off completely as i tried today and he went for a wander round the stable with me in tow trying to get him to stand still little sod. 

 

I also learnt today that to put him into the field one has got to go in with him close the gate take the headcollar off squeeze back out of the gate with him loking longingly after you instead of open the gate step into field but still by the open gate take headcollar off watch horse decide that the grass on the outside of the fence is much easier than having to walk through mud to get to grass first hehe.

 

A pet hate of mine is one woman who i see out on her horse near my house...she wears what looks like linen trousers and walking boots to ride in and is far to big for her horse and she walks him down the road kicking him the whole way....the horse must be a saint i tell you

 

I don't like to see people riding with just a headcollar and lead rope for a start how do they stear lol I couldn't do it for guinness he basicly needs a steering wheel otherwise he pleases himself zigzagging and doesn't do a lot when directed by leg alone!

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Flowerpower5

Joined:

Dec 11

Posts: 2

Flowerpower5 says:

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

 I dont like seeing riders who are talking on their phones its bad because there probably not concentrating so wouldnt be ready if their horse spooked etc. and would'nt be looking at cars and give a bad name to riders hacking on the road.

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CharParsley620

Joined:

Jul 10

Posts: 2406

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

Sometimes I need to call my mum etc whilst out.. Sometimes I can't wait, so I have to do it. I don't really like doing it, but occasionally it's gotta be done!

It's lonely in the saddle since the horse died.

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Silke

Joined:

Dec 11

Posts: 21

Silke says:

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

Um.
You know...when they came up with tying your horse to a piece of string...that was way back when they used to use sisal baling twine. Sisal will rip.
Baling twine (the nylon kind) is designed not to rip. My other half has used the stuff to pull aircraft undercarriages into place at a museum. That ought to tell you how much force is needed to rip baling twine.
I've seen horses rear back and pull the ring out of the wall -- and the "safety string" never broke.
And if you must tie your horse to a piece of string, why not have the string at the headcollar, rather than the fence/wall? If your horse pulls so hard that it rips loose (if that string actually breaks, which is debatable if it's a new string), it'll be tearing around with a rope attached to the collar, and that rope will have an almighty knot at the end. Or worse, a piece of fence / metal ring, if the string doesn't break.
Think about it.
If that rope gets caught in *anything* (and chances are it will, thanks to the knot at the end), how are you going to get your horse loose? I don't fancy having to cut a rope being yanked on by a panicking horse -- do you? You certainly won't be unhooking the damned thing, at least not with the hooks that are sold in the UK on a standard lead rope.
I use a "Panic Hook", it's designed to open if there is a really HARD yank on the rope. (It has to be really sharp to open - but if used wrong, it *can* open when you don't want it to.). I tie to a pillar or a fence, not a piece of string. I had to special order them (hard to come by over here, but possible to get), and the rope my horse was delivered with went in the bin five seconds after I got him off the lorry.
Even my Parelli rope has a panic hook on it. I had it made specially with that. Bit more expensive but well worth it to me.
www.lyndashorsewear.co.uk/images/catalog/panic_clip.JPG
Grew up using them, and never had a problem with them. Even if the horse practially sits on the floor, even if the hook *doesn't* open (steady pull, etc) one quick slide and the thing is off, whether 3lbs or 3 tons are hanging on it.
The piece of string tying seems to be a purely british thing, btw.
I'm not saying you're all wrong. I'm just questioning where that piece of string is attached, and the hooks used in the UK.
Personally?
If I *have* to use a piece of baling twine -- then I'd tie it to the collar, not the post. I'd much rather the horse is loose with just a headcollar, than have a rope with an impossible to open catch attached and get caught -- because then you're in REAL trouble.

"If it's not a Paso Fino...you may as well walk." (Unknown)

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Cobsandshire

Joined:

Dec 09

Posts: 245

Cobsandshire says:

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

You know, I've done a lot of these things as I've been learning over the years.  However, as soon as I've realised the danger I've stopped doing them.  Thankfully, I've always been lucky.  I find it incredibly embarrassing looking back over the stupid things I've done  but I like to think I learn from my mistakes.  However, the most dangerous mistake I used to make is not realising the importance of ground work.  I used to look after my aunt's horses who are half wild - she never looks after them.  This was right at the begining of my horse experience and could have been quite nasty.

One 'dangerous' practice I do still use (and I think it's dodgy every time) is I ride in wellies in the winter.  I do have safety stirrups but it's still not ideal.  The problem is, Noah's 17.2hh and I can't get on from the ground so I have to lead him through the muddy gateways to get on from the bank beside the road.  I have the legs of a footballer  so proper long riding boots don't fit.

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brook

Joined:

Sep 08

Posts: 5217

brook says:

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

I agree with silke about baling twine, it's extremely strong so i always fray it with a knife before using as a weak link on the tie ring.

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3MoodyMaresMum

Joined:

Jun 09

Posts: 830

Re: Dangerous practices !!!

Hate baling twine - probably because I was lazy once and had it on tie rings, TB spooked pulled back and the only thing to give was the 9ft length of wood the tie ring was attached too - ended up with a horse terrified galloping around attached to length of wood with the nails still attached which was whipping around and cut her to pieces and loads of puncture wounds - I now only use gardening string which will break with pressure.

Otherwise, today's dangerous practice is going into my WB's stable armed with head collar and syringe of medicine only to be greeted with 2 back feet and being told very clearly she did not want her medicine - little madam and I hav always said I trust her with my life - hmmm not today 16hh and 560Kgs giving you the double barrell is not appealing

There is no greater gift than to share time with a creature of such beauty - The Horse.

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