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You are in... Forums > Welcome To Your Horse Forum > The Yard > Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

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Nicola Young

Joined:

Jun 10

Posts: 174

Nicola Young says:

Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Back by popular demand, is the YH Live Web Chat!

This month we are delighted to announce that Farrier Glyn Trundle will be joining us for an hour to talk to members of the Your Horse forum and discuss concerns they may have on shoeing or trimming.

Glyn will be live on the website from 8pm til 9pm on Tuesday the 22nd of March, where you will have the opportunity to speak to him about any issues that may be troubling you or are curious about.

As an experienced horse rider himself, Glyn is able to sympathise with his clients so there is no need to feel that any worry is too small!

Glyn currently has two horses - Barlow, who is a 1 year old ISH and Stan (Take The Stand) who is 15.

To find out more about Glyn, visit his website www.equityshoeing.co.uk or email him on glyntrundle@yahoo.co.uk

[This Topic has been modified by the Author]

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Nicola Young | Web Producer | Your Horse

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monikirk

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 7

monikirk says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

 Thank you for your suggestions for slipping - I'll ask next time farrier visits.

If you have time to respond to everyone I'd like to ask if there are any ways to reduce brushing hind legs - my horse wear boots all the time  when working, I can hear him brushing especially when schooling - he's also worn away his feather and sometimes comes in from turnout with strikes. We have a very reliable farrier but not always the easiest to talk to so hate to ask lots of questions!

Regards

Monica

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GlynTrundle

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 14

GlynTrundle says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Dear Heather

Generally, odd feet is due to one of two things. One, it is congenital, i.e. passed on from the parents, or two, it is acquired due to an injury, poor trimming/foot management as a youngster, or favouring one leg, for example if compensating due to injury, or grazing with a prefered leg forward etc. etc.

As a nine year old, I would not suggest trying to make the feet into a pair. I would shoe each foot to its individual requirements, as long as she is sound, comfortable and happy.

Glyn Trundle | Farrier | Equity Shoeing

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Cocosmom

Joined:

Jan 09

Posts: 2546

Cocosmom says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Thank you Glyn, I believe he was neglected as a baby, he had no clue what we were asking when we 1st asked him to pick up his feet + other medical issues due to lack of care so have a funny feeling it was due to poor foot care when he was younger. He is happy and sound and that is the most important thing!

Thanks again!

Heather

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GlynTrundle

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 14

GlynTrundle says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Dear Vik1

Unfortunately...you don't! Obviously with training, and experience horse owners can hopefully see right from wrong. the farriers registration council does have a continual professional development system in place, to encourage farriers to stay up to date with new techniques and standards. However, unfortunately it is not compulsory. Shoe wear, growth patterns and conformation can indicate to a farrier the horses needs. However, assessing them properly is very worthwhile. If you don't have faith in your farrier, ask your vet who they could suggest and also ask round fellow horse owners to see who they use and recommend. Never be afraid to ask your farrier his opinion on your horses conformation and movement. Often, despite farriers reputations, a good farrier should be open to a consciencious horse owner's interest in their horses well being.

Thanks. Glyn

Glyn Trundle | Farrier | Equity Shoeing

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snowface

Joined:

Feb 11

Posts: 15

snowface says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

GlynTrundle said:

I think that a good starting point for finding a new farrier is somebody who your vet is happy to work with and guide through.

If you would like to send me some pictures please do not be afraid to email me them and I can have a look and hopefully offer you some further advice.

 

Thanks. Glyn


------ End Quote ------

Hey I dont have any pictures but can take some tomorrow - is there any way I could email them to you tomorrow or is that too late! I have also rung all 6 farriers on my vets reccomendation and none of them will take on new customers :( - hence why I was wondering if just finding a new farrier might be a good idea and if a remedial one is more experienced/qualified than a "normal" farrier in general and if yes how much more roughly do they cost? I can get copies of x-rays etc :)

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GlynTrundle

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 14

GlynTrundle says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Dear Sam

Horses feet are directly related to their conformation. In basic terms, if a foot is upright but is attached to an upright pastern and in turn, the horse has an upright shoulder, these structures will all work in unison and one angle cannot be changed without affecting the other joints and angles involved. The same goes for sloping feet/pasterns/shoulders etc.  You don't mention how old your horse is, but if he is of any age, angles should not be dramatically changed as it affects the bone structures and soft tissues involved, possibly leading to soreness and injury. If you don't feel you are making satisfactory progress with your current trimming programme, speak to your farrier again or change to somebody who will work with you and listen to your concerns. Thanks

Glyn Trundle | Farrier | Equity Shoeing

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GlynTrundle

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 14

GlynTrundle says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Dear Micki

The structure that you are describing sounds like the bars of the foot. They start at the heel, forming the seat of corn with the hoof wall and run forwards towards the toe, running parallel with the frog. Horses that are kept barefoot often grow large bars to over-compensate for an extra wear. Horses that go barefoot successfully are those that grow the same amount or more foot than they wear out. There is nothing to worry about but just make your farrier aware next visit.

Hope this helps! Thanks. Glyn

Glyn Trundle | Farrier | Equity Shoeing

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GlynTrundle

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 14

GlynTrundle says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Hi

Yes tomorrow is fine. Please email the pics to glyntrundle@yahoo.co.uk. Also, if you include where abouts you live I will have a look on the list and see if I know any of the farriers in your area, and try to pull a few strings for you. Farriers prices vary greatly depending on numerous factors. Don't be fooled by thinking the most expensive is always best.

Look forward to hearing from you and hopefully can advise you further. Thanks, Glyn

Glyn Trundle | Farrier | Equity Shoeing

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Micki

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 3580

Micki says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Thankyou for the reply. I didn't think it was anything to worry about and your answer has confirmed that thanks. Yes I will mention it when the farrier is back out to trim them.

. .A horse is a thing of such beauty. . .none will tire of looking at him as long as he displays himself in his splendor. ~Xenophon https://www.facebook.com/browbandsandbracelets

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GlynTrundle

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 14

GlynTrundle says:

Re: Live Web Chat with Farrier Glyn Trundle

Monikirk

There are lots of things your farrier can do to help. Firstly, he needs to assess your horses movement and foot balance. It sometimes can be as simple as just reducing flare on the inside of the foot. Lateral extensions (shoeing wide on the outside) often works really well by giving your horse a wider stance behind. Machine made shoes can easily be adapted into a lateral extension hind so your farrier should be able to do it easily 'on the job' if he deems it necessary. Sometimes young horses brush through physical weakness. Long, slow strenghening work is very beneficial to also help the problem.

Thanks. Glyn

Glyn Trundle | Farrier | Equity Shoeing

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