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You are in... Forums > Archive (locked) > Riding > I wanted to buy him!

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hattioats

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 1

hattioats says:

I wanted to buy him!

Back in February I did work experience in my local stables, 25 minutes cycle away from my house, and one of my jobs was to school a young cob who I named Atticus. He's 4 years old and hasn't been gelded yet. I never had any trouble with him during those 2 weeks; we hacked out with others and once by ourselves and I schooled him in the arena aswell as in group lessons; walking, trotting, cantering and doing small jumps. He's lazy to lunge, doesn't like having his headband put over his ears and hates being stabled [the instructor kept him stabled for once weekend and he kicked down the door] but he's easy to catch, follows me everywhere and is very well-mannered. I'm now allowed go riding Atticus for free whenever I want and I go over at least once a week, every day during school holidays. The weekend after work experience I went hacking to the local beach with 4 others and we galloped all the way down the beach, it's 2 miles long at low tide; I thought Atticus would be worn out but when we were leaving he was still full of beans! At the beach everyone was fawning over him and asking how old he was and were commenting on how he's not at all babyish. We were actually thinking of buying him for my 16th birthday. Unfortunately, since I'm back in school Atticus is getting out of practice [nobody else ever rides him], he's hit puberty and he's got spring fizz. He's a completely changed pony. The first time I tried to school him in the arena over Easter, he was impossible to mount up on. He usually shuffles a bit, but he was walking all over the place. He was so calm in February that although he's young, I was able to mount as soon as I tacked him up and go straight away with no trouble, and he's settle after 10 minutes or so. The first time I tried to school him over Easter, I had to corner him in the arena and stick my foot in the stirrup; he walked off so I was hopping along the ground for a few minutes and when I managed to get in the saddle he cantered off. After doing a few laps in trot I jumped a 1 foot fence twice, then he started sticking in the corner by the gate. I managed to get him out with a bit of persistence and walked around the arena for a break, then did some cantering; he cantered where I asked him to, but instead of slowing down when I asked for trot, he bolted. He crashed into the railing by the gate twice, because he couldn't turn the corner in time, and he didn't want to turn anyway. Determined not to finish the session on a bad note, I walked a figure of 8 and some circles and then tried to take him hacking. That's when he had his first real stallion moment, when I tried to take him away from his friends he started only going backwards, a passerby had to lead him past the field for me. After that I managed to get him to walk to for a bit, but only to the end of his field. He started backing up and spinning at that point, every time I got him to take a step forward he's take two steps back, and I ended up getting off and leading him. when we'd gone around the corner and out of sight of the other horses, I let hi mgraze at the side of the road and mounted up without trouble, but he started spinning straight away and bolted for the field. I dismounted again and lead him halfway around the route we were taking, I had no trouble at all leading him, and when I got up he was in a great hurry to get home. The next day I lunged him for half an hour, walking and trotting with a little canter [like I said, he's lazy to lunge], then did some free jumping, then went for a quiet hack with another girl and then went around the crosscountry course with her and the instructor; just trotting, going up and down banks and jumping the smaller, simpler fences. Atticus is a nifty little jumper and he did alright across country, but he did keep trying to bolt for home. By the end of it, he still wasn't settled. Yesterday I went to the stables, I hadn't been there in just over a week, and Atticus was a disaster. I lunged him f

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popsicle

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 74

popsicle says:

Re: I wanted to buy him!

Hi Hattioats. What a shame you are having these problems. It sounds like a combination of Atticus being young and green, spring grass and lack of training. I wouldn't rush to buy him at the moment, it sounds like he will need a lot of patience and hard work to be the type of horse you need and i doubt you will have the time and possibly not the experience? to do this on your own. You mention several different problems, napping, bolting and not standing to be mounted. Napping and bolting back to the field, shows lack of "trust" in his rider and wanting to be with his buddies where he feels safe. Moving when mounted, again lack of trust and respect. Most of this can be overcome with plenty of groundwork, schooling and patience, he needs to see you as his herd leader and trust that he will be safe with you away from the herd. You might want to consider Parelli. But i would try to get a knowledgeable grown up to help you. Good luck[:)]

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xxlucywildxx

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 482

xxlucywildxx says:

Re: I wanted to buy him!

Geld him before you buy him! It may be too late, but it should help a little with handling etc. The readon I say this is because nobody wants little accident foals, and if you do buy him, you're going to need A LOT of safe, secure and strong fencing. Most local shows won't allow stallions, and if he is this bolshy, you wouldn't stand a chance if an in-season mare strolled past him in a warm up ring! So yes, geld him, I'd ask the stables to pay, on the basis that you would continue to school him and if you saw an improvement would consider buying him. Hopefully you will get your calm cob back, without decent stallion handling experience please don't buy him ungelded! It needs to be done ASAP, before the mares come into season, and before he realises what his testicles are for! good luck, and i hope you get on better with him [:D]

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racaille

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 819

racaille says:

Re: I wanted to buy him!

Yup, CUT 'EM OFF! I can't see any reason at all to keep a boy entire unless he is the most perfect specimen and is specifically for breeding. Some of what you have described is just youth/spring etc, but sounds like he's beginning to get those hormones big time. It's not too late: we had a beastly little boy who was gelded as he arrived at the club aged about 10. A year later he is an angel, although he is still dominant (and will always be) with other males.

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Brigadier

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 237

Brigadier says:

Re: I wanted to buy him!

Sounds good advice to me!!!! Nip and Tuck!

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